Bethany Daigle

Scroll to Info & Navigation

Hi most of my Facebook feed that seems to be the most vocal,

Let’s stop posting things in defense of the officer until all facts are known. Let’s stop being mad at the “race-baiters” while spouting off thinly veiled racist things (such as “those people” and “thugs”). Stop arguing about whether or not Michael Brown deserved death (FYI, he didn’t) Here’s a cause to focus on: let’s worry about the militarization of our police and the suppression of freedom of speech. Let’s worry about why MRAP vehicles are accepted on our suburban streets (here is an article about that months ago http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/police-surplus-armored-trucks-iraq-article-1.1527650) and why we’re supposed to be ok with that. 

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2014/08/19/1322893/-Ferguson-Spotlights-War-on-Jounralists

Photos by arrested photographer, Scott Olson

Beautiful Moments

All the way back in 2008 I did a study abroad program in Oxford, UK. For anyone who knows me personally is aware how much this trip meant to me. I made lifelong friends and lived in a gorgeous, suspended reality. Towards the end of the trip I was weighing probably the lowest I had ever weighed since childhood, but I didn’t realize that. I knew I wasn’t really focusing on weight loss. It was just sort of happening. I was busy having fun, and I had way more priorities (like flirting with British boys studying). I remember taking photos and criticizing my appearance. Now, there were a few photos I thought, “Dannnnggg girl. You look good!” but for the most part, I had negative thoughts about the majority of my photos.

Over the years, I have looked back at the photos (Full disclosure: I have put on weight since then). I’m always amazed at how good I looked compared to how I felt in the moment. Since then (ugh honesty hour/embarrassing hour), with Instagram and things such as #throwbackThursday, I have wanted to post pictures of my time over there. But I don’t – I don’t post any with me in them because I think people will see the photo and think how much better I looked then (and subsequently how gross I look now). I had subconsciously started to view that time in my life as my “prettiest.” But in the moment, I certainly did not think that! It got me thinking (always dangerous). Somewhere in my mind I had a standard of beauty that I was not meeting while I was in Oxford. And now, I still hold that same standard of beauty but was closer to it in Oxford than I am now? How could that be possible? If I didn’t think I was there in 2008, I certainly can’t think that now (because of time not going backwards, duh). This is probz a little wordy so I’ll try to sum up what I’m trying to convey.

I’ll only be as beautiful as I am right now. There is only one standard of beauty for me and that is however I look in this moment. It doesn’t matter what my future holds and what hairstyle I’ll have in 10 years or the standard of beauty I think I’m not at yet. I can only be beautiful right now, in this moment. But that’s good news! If I’m only beautiful in whatever moment I’m in, I’m always in a moment (because I can only exist one moment at a time, duh) so that means I’m always beautiful!  And because I’m beautiful in the moment, once the moment passes, I’ll still be beautiful. So I can look back proudly at Oxford and say, “Dannnnggg girl! You’re right. You did look good.” But now I can also look myself in the mirror, right now, and say, “Dannnnggg girl. You’ll never look more or less beautiful than you look right now.” And that’s a fine standard of beauty to achieve. ***

To get over my insecurity of posting Oxford pictures, here’s a photo of me being extremely excited about seeing Clarence House.  

image

***I’m learning that there is not much of a difference between viewing myself as beautiful and desiring to be healthy. It’s a difficult balance between body acceptance and self-discipline, but I’m working on it.  

If you’ve got it, flaunt it!

Originally I filmed this to send a silly snapchat to some friends, but it got me thinking. 

Sometimes I will like something about myself, but then I’m convinced I’m being vain or conceited. Nah, boo. Like what you like. Clearly, I’m not talking about unhealthy vanity or narcissism. I’m just talking about some good old-fashion “I am beautiful” affirmation crap! Say it if it’s true!

We spend too much time telling ourselves what ISN’T true like, “I’m worthless” or “you must look like ‘x’ to be accepted.” Tell yourself you’re beautiful because that—for sure—is true.